Miningwatch

Pip payments

Posted on 24 февраля, 2021 by minini

UK, remember your settings and improve government services. You can change your cookie settings at any time. This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives. Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned. This is a copy of a document that stated a policy of the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition pip payments. Issue Many people on benefits believe that the financial risks of moving into work are too great.

For some, the gains from work, particularly if they work part-time, are small, and any gain can easily be cancelled out by costs such as transport. Actions We are reforming the welfare system to help more people to move into and progress in work, while supporting the most vulnerable. Introducing Universal Credit We began to introduce Universal Credit in 2013. It brings together a range of working-age benefits into a single payment. PIP helps towards some of the extra costs because of a long term ill-health condition or disability.

DLA was introduced in 1992 for children and adults who need help with personal care or mobility. It had not been fundamentally reviewed or reformed since. There was confusion about the purpose of the benefit, it was complex to claim and there was no systematic way of checking that awards remain correct. Introducing the Jobseeker’s Allowance Claimant Commitment We have introduced a new Claimant Commitment that outlines what jobseeking actions a claimant must carry out while receiving Jobseeker’s Allowance. The Claimant Commitment brings Jobseeker’s Allowance into line with claimants’ responsibilities under Universal Credit. Introducing a cap on the amount of benefits working age people can receive In 2013 we introduced a cap on the total amount of benefits that most people aged 16 to 64 can receive.

This means that households on certain benefits can no longer receive more in benefits than the average wage for working families. 2008 for claimants making a new claim because of illness or incapacity. From October 2010, those people who are still receiving the older style incapacity benefits are being reassessed and moved to ESA or other benefits more appropriate to their circumstances. Improving the Work Capability Assessment Anyone claiming ESA will have a Work Capability Assessment to assess their capability for work. To ensure that the Work Capability Assessment is as fair and accurate as possible, we are continuing to review and improve it. Making sure housing support is fair and affordable We are creating a fairer approach to the way we pay housing costs to help bring stability to the housing market and improve incentives for people to find work or increase their hours. From April 2013 we have introduced new rules for the size of accommodation that Housing Benefit, and then Universal Credit, will cover for working age tenants renting in the social housing sector.

Increasing penalties for benefit fraud We introduced tougher penalties for people who commit benefit fraud in the Welfare Reform Act 2012. Universal Credit: welfare that works’, published on 11 November 2010, we set out plans to introduce Universal Credit in 2013. Universal Credit at work’, published on 22 October 2014, we report on the progress of the rollout of Universal Credit. Welfare reform communications toolkit Our welfare reform communications toolkit helps explain how DWP is changing the welfare system. Who we’ve consulted We consulted on proposals to simplify the benefits system to improve work incentives in ’21st century welfare’ between 30 July and 1 October 2010. Personal Independence Payment between 6 December 2010 and 18 February 2011.

We sought views on initial proposals for the draft assessment criteria for Personal Independence Payment between 9 May and 31 August 2011. Following feedback on the initial proposals, we revised the draft assessment criteria for Personal Independence Payment. We consulted on the second draft of the assessment criteria for Personal Independence Payment between 16 January and 30 April 2012. We consulted on proposals on some of the rules for claiming Personal Independence Payment, Disability Living Allowance, Carer’s Allowance and Attendance Allowance between 26 March and 30 June 2012. From Monday 24 June to Monday 5 August 2013, we ran a further consultation on the mobility component of PIP to give everyone the opportunity to contribute their views. In 2014 DWP appointed Paul Gray CB to undertake the first independent review of the PIP assessment. A call for evidence to inform the review ran from 23 June 2014 to 5 September 2014.

On 10 December 2012 we published the SSAC’s report on the consultation together with the government’s response. In September 2014, the government asked SSAC to consider proposals that certain Universal Credit claimants must wait 7 days before they are entitled to benefit. SSAC are consulting on these proposals from 19 September 2014 to 17 October 2014. Jobseeker’s Allowance or Employment and Support Allowance consultations In April 2014, the government asked SSAC consider its proposals to extend from 3 to 7 the number of days a claimant must wait before they are entitled to get Jobseeker’s Allowance or Employment and Support Allowance. The department continues to carry out analysis of the likely impacts of its policies on groups such as disabled people. Bills and legislation The changes to the welfare system are contained in the Welfare Reform Act 2012. We have published and will continue to publish regulations relating to the Welfare Reform Act 2012.

We have published more information about changes to Employment and Support Allowance in 2012 under the Welfare Reform Act and some commonly asked question and answers. This page explains the government’s policy on Universal Credit. If you are looking for information about how Universal Credit will affect you, see information for Universal Credit claimants. Universal Credit is a new single payment for people who are looking for work or on a low income. Universal Credit will help claimants and their families to become more independent and will simplify the benefits system by bringing together a range of working-age benefits into a single payment. Universal Credit pathfinder Starting in April 2013, DWP, with our delivery partners in HMRC and local authorities, is introducing Universal Credit for claimants within certain areas of the north-west of England. Universal Credit We will introduce Universal Credit in a managed way, progressively rolling it out nationally from October 2013. The transition from the current system of benefits and tax credits to Universal Credit will be gradual and it is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

Additional support for Universal Credit claimants Giving evidence at the Work and Pensions Select Committee on 17 September 2012, Ministers announced 3 additional areas of support for Universal Credit claimants. Help with budgeting DWP will explore the feasibility of new types of bank accounts or other financial products to help benefit claimants budget and manage their money. DWP wants to continue to provide a flexible system to help meet the higher costs often associated with providing supported accommodation. Self-employment start up period We recognise the need for claimants who are setting up a business to be given time to establish themselves and find sources of support. Therefore where a claimant has been self-employed for less than 12 months, a start up period will be granted. This will give them time to concentrate on developing their business. Claimants will be allowed a new start up period every 5 years rather than once in their lifetime. Universal Credit local support services framework’.

The framework was developed following careful and intensive working between DWP and colleagues in the Local Government Association, Convention of Scottish Local Authorities and Welsh Local Government Associations with input from local authority representatives. We invited feedback on the framework and published a summary of the responses on 2 August 2013. Evaluation framework On 10 December 2012 we published an evaluation framework for Universal Credit. The framework sets out our broad intentions for the evaluation of Universal Credit, highlights the main aims and objectives of the evaluation and considers possible analytical approaches. Providing information about Universal Credit We have published information about Universal Credit for claimants. They can find out if they are eligible and what they need to do to get ready for Universal Credit. Universal Credit toolkit for partner organisations’. The toolkit contains information that will help these organisations to explain the changes that Universal Credit will bring for their customers.

It includes a range of information products that can be printed off and shared and brand guidelines to help you create your own materials. From April 2013 we introduced a cap on the total amount of benefits that working age people can receive. Households on working age benefits can no longer receive more in benefits than the average wage for working families. The cap can be applied through Housing Benefit payments or Universal Credit. These arrangements will continue until Universal Credit is fully in place and the cap from Housing Benefit is no longer required. The cap will not apply to households entitled to Working Tax Credit, or the earnings equivalent under Universal Credit.

This will increase the incentive for people on out-of-work benefits to find jobs because once they are receiving Working Tax Credit their benefits will no longer be capped. It will not apply to war widows and widowers. 350 a week for single adult households without children. 1,517 a month for a single claimant with no dependent children. We are creating a fairer approach to Housing Benefit to bring stability to the market and improve incentives to work. Housing support under Universal Credit Universal Credit is a new single payment that we are introducing for people who are looking for work or on a low income. It replaces a number of other benefits, including Housing Benefit.

Universal Credit will include an appropriate amount to help meet the costs of household rent or mortgage interest. Changes to housing support in the social rented sector and the private rented sector We have introduced new rules for the size of accommodation that Housing Benefit, and then Universal Credit, will cover for working age tenants renting in the social sector. This brings them in line with those renting in the private rented sector. From April 2013 all current and future working age tenants renting from a local authority, housing association or other registered social landlord no longer receive help towards the costs of a spare room. They receive help towards their housing costs based on the need of their household. Children who cannot share a bedroom because of a disability or medical condition may be entitled to an extra room.

Claimants will need to contact their local authority and will be asked for medical evidence to support their claim. The rules mean that those tenants whose accommodation is larger than they need may lose part of the money they get towards their housing through Housing Benefit or Universal Credit. There is more information in the under-occupation of social housing impact assessment. Foster carers and armed forces personnel On 12 March 2013 we clarified how these rules affect foster carers and armed forces personnel. An additional bedroom is allowed for adult children who are in the armed forces and continue to live with their parents, even when they are deployed on operations. This means that the size criteria does not apply to the room normally occupied by the member of the armed forces. Direct Payments in the social rented sector We believe that Universal Credit payments should replicate as far as possible how people are paid when they are in work.

We want to see very many more people handle their own benefit and rent payments. Housing costs within Universal Credit will be paid directly to individuals in the social rented sector, rather than the current system of payments direct to landlords. This will encourage people to manage their own budget in the same way as other households. The government recognises the importance of stable income from rent for social landlords to support the creation of new homes. We have included safeguards in Universal Credit to help protect landlords’ income. We have also put in place support mechanisms for tenants who may need help managing their finances. Direct Payment demonstration projects We have been working with a number of local authority and housing association partnerships to test changes to the way housing support is paid in the social rented sector. These projects saw some tenants in the social rented sector receiving monthly Housing Benefit payments, paid directly to them for the first time.

We have published feedback from the projects. Lord Freud, the Minister for Welfare Reform, gave a speech about direct payments in the social rented sector on 14 September 2011. It emphasises the claimants’ responsibility to do all they can to look for work in return for the support they receive from the state. What the JSA Claimant Commitment means When someone makes a new claim for JSA or returns to JSA from the Work Programme they will attend an interview with a work coach. The work coach will explain the penalties claimants could face for failing to meet their responsibilities to get into work. They will review the plan regularly.

The Claimant Commitment strengthens the ability of Jobcentre Plus staff to support claimants back into work at the earliest opportunity and redefines the relationship between the welfare state and claimants. In return for state support, we expect claimants to do all they can to meet their responsibilities to return to work. The Claimant Commitment is already in place for Universal Credit claimants. The following regulations relating to the Welfare Reform Act 2012 are published on the legislation. 23 for relevant Universal Credit claims made from 10 June 2015. Universal Credit to further postcodes in the London Boroughs of Sutton, Croydon and Southwark in three phases from 18 March, 10 June and 4 November 2015.

Universal Credit claims for single claimants between 16 February and 20 July 2015. Universal Credit claims from claimants with children in all current Live Service offices. This is implemented in two phases on 26 January and 2 March 2015. Universal Credit new claims in the London Borough of Sutton from 28 January 2015. Universal Credit claims in the London Borough of Sutton for a test period from 26 November to 19 December 2014. Universal Credit claims from claimants with children in Warrington, Birkenhead, Bromborough, Hoylake, Upton and Wallasey Jobcentres from 24 November 2014. Universal Credit claimants, whether claiming under the Live Service or the Digital Service arrangements. Universal Credit in the enhanced Digital Service but will not be implemented in the Live Service.

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Universal Credit in north west England between September and December 2014. 28 July 2014 in all areas where Universal Credit is running. Universal Credit, and provides for the introduction of Universal Credit claims by couples in Hammersmith, Inverness, Rugby, Bath and Harrogate from 30 June 2014. Universal Credit expansion in North West England during June and July 2014. Universal Credit expansion from June 2014. Universal Credit Pathfinder to be extended to Bath and Harrogate on 24 February, and to Shotton on 7 April 2014. Universal Credit Pathfinder to be extended to Rugby and Inverness on 25 November 2013. Universal Credit Pathfinder to be extended to Hammersmith on 28 October 2013.

Universal Credit Pathfinder to be extended to Wigan on 1 July and to Oldham and Warrington on 29 July 2013. Universal Credit Pathfinder to start on 29 April 2013 in Ashton-under-Lyne. Universal Credit Advances and Short Term Benefit Advances and replace Budgeting Loans with Budgeting Advances. Universal Credit 1 month in arrears. Universal Credit, including entitlement, elements of the award, calculation of income and capital, and claimant responsibilities, and also allow for a benefit cap. Employment and Support Allowance sanctions regime with Universal Credit and introduce hardship payments prior to introduction of Universal Credit.

This page explains the government’s policy on introducing Personal Independence Payment. If you are looking for information about how Personal Independence Payment will affect you, see information for Personal Independence Payment claimants. We are committed to supporting disabled people to lead independent and active lives. PIP helps towards some of the extra costs arising from a long term ill-health condition or disability and is based on how a person’s condition affects them, not the condition they have. It is not means-tested or subject to tax and it is payable to people who are both in and out of work. We have run a number of consultations to help us develop PIP.

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There are no plans to replace DLA for children under 16 or for DLA recipients who were aged 65 and over on 8 April 2013. PIP is based on an assessment of individual need. It will not consider what impairment an individual has, labelling them simply on this basis. Instead it will consider how their impairment affects their life, considering their ability to carry out a range of everyday activities. Information will be gathered from the individual, as well as health, social care and other professionals who work with and support them. Most people will be asked to attend a face-to-face consultation with an independent health professional as part of the assessment process.

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The health professional will ask questions about the claimant’s circumstances, their health condition or disability and how this affects their daily life. This concept had always been integral to the department’s proposals for the PIP assessment, but ministers agreed to include it in the regulations to make the policy intent clear in legislation. We recognise that the reliability criteria are an important protection for claimants. The full PIP regulations are published on the legislation. We extended this to cover all parts of Great Britain from June 2013. We have taken a controlled approach to the introduction of PIP, continuously testing and reviewing the processes to ensure they are right. This is similar to how we introduced PIP to new claimants from April 2013 and is the way we have been introducing all our other programmes of change. The table shows the areas for the phased approach.

We’ve published a postcode map for these areas. Alongside the phased introduction of reassessment activity, we will continue to take new claims for PIP across Great Britain. We’ll start to ask the majority of existing DLA claimants to claim from later in 2015 and onwards. We will write to individuals in plenty of time and they do not need to contact DWP now. We expect to have contacted everyone who needs to claim PIP by late 2017. We have sent information about PIP directly to DLA claimants with the annual DLA uprating letter. Information for support organisations and advisers We have published general information about PIP for support organisations and advisers in the Personal Independence Payment toolkit. Common questions and misunderstandings We have published clarification on some common misunderstandings and questions about PIP in the PIP myth buster.

Calculation of income and capital, uK Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details. Universal Credit toolkit for partner organisations’. Interim report on year 1 recommendations In May 2011 the Minister for Employment asked Professor Harrington to provide an interim report on the implementation of his year 1 recommendations. Universal Credit Pathfinder to be extended to Bath and Harrogate on 24 February, ministers announced 3 additional areas of support for Universal Credit claimants. 2014 On 10 April 2014, pIP helps towards some of the extra costs because of a long term ill, the work coach will explain the penalties claimants could face for failing to meet their responsibilities to get into work.

Policy briefing notes We have published a series of policy briefing notes that set out important elements of policy and strategy relating to PIP and provide greater clarity on our proposals. Guide for assessment providers We have produced guidance for providers carrying out assessments for PIP. PIP statistics We have published statistics about PIP claims. Independent review of PIP assessments Section 89 of the Welfare Reform Act 2012 commits the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions to publish 2 independent reports on how the PIP assessment is working. 2014 On 10 April 2014, the Minister of State for Disabled People appointed Paul Gray to lead the first independent review of the PIP assessment. We published Paul Gray’s independent review on 17 December 2014. Paul Gray ran a call for evidence to inform his review from 23 June 2014 to 5 September 2014. The government published its response to the review on 27 February 2015.

Work Capability Assessment to assess their capability for work. Independent review of the Work Capability Assessment To make sure that the Work Capability Assessment is as fair and accurate as possible, we have set up a process of ongoing review and improvement. Section 10 of the Welfare Reform Act 2007 commits the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions to publish an independent report each year for the first 5 years of operation. 2014 We announced the re-appointment of Dr Paul Litchfield to carry out the fifth and final independent review of the Work Capability Assessment on 6 March 2014. We published the fifth independent review of the Work Capability Assessment on 27 November 2014. We published the government’s response to the review on 27 February 2015. Dr Litchfield ran a call for evidence to inform the fifth review from 10 June 2014 to 15 August 2014. 2013 In February 2013 the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions appointed Dr Paul Litchfield to undertake the fourth independent review of the Work Capability Assessment.

Dr Litchfield replaced Professor Malcolm Harrington, who carried out the first 3 independent reviews of the Work Capability Assessment. We published the fourth independent review of the Work Capability Assessment on 12 December 2013. The government published its response on 27 March 2014. Professor Harrington issued a call for evidence to inform his third independent review from 12 July 2012 to 7 September 2012. Professor Harrington ran a call for evidence to inform his second independent review from 4 July 2011 to 16 September 2011. Professor Harrington ran a call for evidence to inform his first independent review from 28 July 2010 to 10 September 2011. Interim report on year 1 recommendations In May 2011 the Minister for Employment asked Professor Harrington to provide an interim report on the implementation of his year 1 recommendations.

Audio recording pilot In his year 1 review Professor Harrington recommended that Atos Healthcare pilot the audio recording of face-to-face assessments to see if this approach would be helpful to claimants and improve the quality of assessments. A pilot was undertaken in spring 2011. Evidence based review of the Work Capability Assessment On 12 December 2013 we published the Evidence based review of the Work Capability Assessment. UK Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details. UK To help us improve GOV. UK, we’d like to know more about your visit today. All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3. This means it is not affected by earnings, other income or savings.

You must be over 16 and have not yet reached State Pension Age to claim. Each component has a standard or enhanced level, assessed under 12 activities, 10 for daily living and 2 for mobility. To qualify, you must have met the conditions for 3 months and be likely to meet them for the next 9 months. In exceptional cases, where your needs are unlikely to change, awards can be ongoing. All awards will be reviewed from time to time to check your support meets your needs. If this assessment would not be accessible for you, contact the organisation that sent you the letter. This will be Capita or Independent Assessment Services. All working-age people still receiving DLA are likely to be reassessed for PIP.

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